The Digital Gap Between Rich and Poor Kids Is Not What We Expected

(The New York Times)

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The parents in Overland Park, Kan., were fed up. They wanted their children off screens, but they needed strength in numbers. First, because no one wants their kid to be the lone weird one without a phone. And second, because taking the phone away from a middle schooler is actually very, very tough.

“We start the meetings by saying, ‘This is hard, we’re in a new frontier, but who is going to help us?’” said Krista Boan, who is leading a Kansas City-based program called START, which stands for Stand Together And Rethink Technology. “We can’t call our moms about this one.”

I first noticed this gap almost a decade ago visiting college campuses. When I would sit in on classes​ at small private colleges​s students with ​laptops were a rare sight. At community colleges,​ they were slightly​ more common. At state universities, with amphitheater​ sized classrooms,​ they were all too common. Equally all too common was how many were all tuned to social media.​

Universal Broadband Won’t Save Us

(The Nation)

All of this isn’t to say that we don’t need universal broadband access; we unequivocally do. The problem isn’t that centrist technocrats seek to broaden Internet access; it’s how they seek to broaden it. As others have argued, leaders should embrace the conceit of Internet access for all, but instead of funneling millions of additional dollars to telecom giants, dedicate broadband policy to serving the public, like any other public utility. At the local level, this prospect has already proven feasible and popular—perhaps a glimpse into how a piecemeal, inchoate series of projects might mature into a robust nationwide public infrastructure.

Connect Local?  Think Local, Connect Global? Local/Global to Table?  Free Range Access? It needs a chatchphrase and the catchphrase needs a movment. A national policy with lots of little local hubs.  Done right this makes the American portion of the global Internet  more secure on multipule levels.

 

 

More people are taking Facebook breaks and deleting the app from their phones

(The Verge)

According to new data from Pew Research Center that sampled US Facebook users aged 18 and up, 4 in 10 (42 percent) of those surveyed have taken a break from the social network for “several weeks or more” in the last year; a quarter of respondents said they’ve deleted the mobile app entirely from their smartphones.

I was always stunned​ adults put that app on their phone. I have serious regrets about ever advocating​ the use of Facebook.

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